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Reject ‘false hope’ of violence, archbishop implores after Ferguson ruling
St. Louis Archbishop Robert J. Carlson prays with the St. Louis police Nov. 24, a few hours before the announcement that a St. Louis County grand jury determined there was not enough evidence to indict Ferguson, Mo., Police Officer Darren Wilson in the Aug. 9 shooting death of Michael Brown. (CNS photo/Lisa Johnston, St. Louis Review) See STLOUIS-RACE and FERGUSON-REACT Nov. 25, 2014.

St. Louis Archbishop Robert J. Carlson prays with the St. Louis police Nov. 24, a few hours before the announcement that a St. Louis County grand jury determined there was not enough evidence to indict Ferguson, Mo., Police Officer Darren Wilson in the Aug. 9 shooting death of Michael Brown. (CNS photo/Lisa Johnston, St. Louis Review)

By Matt Hadro
CNA/EWTN News 

FERGUSON, MO. — The Archbishop of St. Louis rejected violent responses to a grand jury’s decision not to indict a Ferguson police officer who killed a teenager, asking instead for prayer and action to solve underlying community problems.

“Since the grand jury received the case in August, we have seen offensive and violent outbursts by protesters, and acts of civil disobedience. Despite our calls for peace, which Michael Brown’s family have echoed, we continue to see that segments of our community have not fully renounced the tendency to lash out with antagonistic behavior and violence,” Archbishop Robert Carlson of St. Louis said in a response to the grand jury’s decision. Continue reading

 
As Obama unveils program, other efforts aim to help Central Americans

U.S. President Barack Obama addresses reporters in the East Room of the White House Nov. 5 in Washington. The president held the news conference one day after after Republicans won enough seats to give them them a majority in the U.S. Senate and captured their biggest majority in the House of Representatives in more than 60 years. The president said he is still prepared to sign executive orders to deal with the country's "broken" immigration system by the end of 2014 if Congress doesn't pass meaningful reforms. (CNS photo/Kevin Lamarque, Reuters)

By Patricia Zapor
Catholic News Service

WASHINGTON — As millions of immigrants celebrate the possibility of protection from deportation under a new Obama administration plan, among those who cannot take advantage of it will be the 68,445 families and 68,541 unaccompanied minors who were apprehended at the border in the last fiscal year.

The children and families, most from Central America, drew international attention last summer as their numbers overwhelmed governmental and private agencies that process their legal cases, and provide housing, social services and foster care. The record-setting number of apprehensions has declined significantly because of efforts on both ends of the migrant pipeline. And steps are being taken to address problems in their home countries that cause people to leave. Continue reading

 
Rally with Thanksgiving theme last-minute plea for immigration order

U.S. Rep. Luis Gutierrez, D-Illinois, speaks at an immigration rally in front of the White House Nov. 19. Gutierrez was joined by immigrant farm, food and commercial workers from across the country to remind Americans of the people behind their Thanksgiving meal and to urge President Barack Obama to take the broadest executive action possible on immigration. (CNS photo/Tyler Orsburn)

By Patricia Zapor
Catholic News Service 

WASHINGTON — A table spread with the components of Thanksgiving dinner, with the White House as a backdrop, set the scene Nov. 19 for what would turn out to be a last-minute pitch to the president to protect some of the nation’s 11 million immigrants who are in the country illegally.

Shortly before the White House said President Barack Obama would announce executive actions on immigration Nov. 20, advocates for immigration reform set a folding table in the middle of Pennsylvania Avenue and covered it with vegetables, fruit, bread and two frozen turkeys. Continue reading

 
Jesus invites all to take risk ‘of being more,’ says Chicago archbishop upon installation

Archbishop Blase J. Cupich walks down center aisle of Holy Name Cathedral in Chicago at the start of his installation Mass Nov. 18. Pope Francis named Archbishop Cupich in September by Pope Francis to succeed Cardinal Francis E. George as Chicago's archbishop. (CNS photo/Charles Rex Arbogast, Reuters)

By Catholic News Service 

CHICAGO — At his installation as the ninth archbishop of Chicago Nov. 18, Archbishop Blase J.Cupich urged the congregation at Chicago’s Holy Name Cathedral to fearlessly share their faith recognizing that God calls them “to more” and “to greater things.”

Before an overflow crowd, the archbishop said he had “a bit of a panic attack” when he saw the day’s Gospel reading was about Jesus walking on water and calling his disciples to follow him. Continue reading

 
Retiring Cardinal George opens up on faith, freedom and death
Cardinal Francis E. George gives the final blessing during a rite of welcome ceremony for Archbishop Blase J. Cupich Nov. 17 at Holy Name Cathedral in Chicago. Archbishop Cupich, whose installation as Chicago's new archbishop was set for Nov. 18, is Pope Francis' first major appointment for the hierarchy of the U.S. Catholic Church. (CNS photo/John Smerciak, Catholic New World) See CUPICH-INSTALL Nov. 18, 2014.

Cardinal Francis E. George gives the final blessing during a rite of welcome ceremony for Archbishop Blase J. Cupich Nov. 17 at Holy Name Cathedral in Chicago. Archbishop Cupich, whose installation as Chicago's new archbishop was set for Nov. 18, is Pope Francis' first major appointment for the hierarchy of the U.S. Catholic Church. (CNS photo/John Smerciak, Catholic New World)

CNA/EWTN News

As he enters retirement, Cardinal Francis George of Chicago noted the importance of living faith in the truth, reflecting on his time as archbishop, the approach of death, and advice for his successor, Archbishop-designate Blase Cupich.

“The faith, what it means, and then the habits of life that protect a life of faith, are part of personal formation in the truth, and the Church should attend to those dimensions as much as she possibly can,” the 77-year-old Cardinal George said in an interview with the Catholic New World, published Nov. 16. Continue reading

 
Pope confirms he will visit Philadelphia in September

Pilgrim waves a U.S. flag as Pope Francis arrives to lead general audience April 30. Pope Francis has announced he will come to Philadelphia in 2015. (CNS photo/Paul Haring)

By Francis X. Rocca
Catholic News Service 

VATICAN CITY — Pope Francis said he would attend the World Meeting of Families in Philadelphia in September, making it the first confirmed stop on what is expected to be a more extensive papal visit to North America.

The pope made the announcement Nov. 17 in a speech opening an interreligious conference on traditional marriage. Continue reading

 
Ruling sets up possible Supreme Court round on same-sex marriage
Supporters of traditional marriage pray the rosary outside the Potter Stewart Courthouse in downtown Cincinnati on Aug. 6. The women pictured were part of a prayer gathering that took place as judges inside began a review of several marriage-related cases. (CT Photo/John Stegeman)

Supporters of traditional marriage pray the rosary outside the Potter Stewart Courthouse in downtown Cincinnati on Aug. 6. The women pictured were part of a prayer gathering that took place as judges inside began a review of several marriage-related cases. (CT Photo/John Stegeman)

By Patricia Zapor
Catholic News Service 

WASHINGTON — Although the Supreme Court just a few weeks ago declined to accept any of several challenges to rulings making same-sex marriage legal in various states, a 6th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals decision Nov. 6 could lead to another shot at the high court weighing in on a nationwide approach to such unions.

It is the first federal appeals court ruling to uphold states’ rights to decide that marriage may be restricted to only heterosexual couples. Four federal appellate courts — the 4th, 7th, 9th and 10th — have said such bans are unconstitutional. Continue reading

 
Celiac disease, health care, exorcism book on agenda for bishops’ meeting

CNA/EWTN News

The reception of Communion by those with Celiac Disease, avoiding cooperation with evil in health care partnerships, and a possible English translation of an exorcism ritual book are among the topics to be discussed by the U.S. bishops at their fall meeting next week.

The U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops will meet Nov. 10-13 in Baltimore for its annual fall General Assembly. Continue reading

 
Pope appoints Wisconsin bishop to head statewide Diocese of Boise

Bishop Peter F. Christensen of Superior, Wis., right, pictured in this 2012 photo in Vatican City, has been appointed by Pope Francis to be bishop of the Diocese of Boise, Idaho. The appointment was announced Nov. 4 in Washington by Archbishop Carlo Maria Vigano, apostolic nuncio to the U.S. (CNS photo/Paul Haring)

By Catholic News Service 

WASHINGTON — Pope Francis has accepted the resignation of Bishop Michael P. Driscoll of Boise, Idaho, and appointed Bishop Peter F. Christensen of Superior, Wisconsin, to succeed him.

Bishop Driscoll, who has headed the statewide diocese since 1999, is 75, the age at which bishops are required by canon law to turn in their resignation to the pope.

Bishop Christensen, 61, has headed the Diocese of Superior since 2007. Continue reading

 
Maynard suicide called tragedy, symbol of ‘culture of death’ in U.S.

By Catholic News Service 

PORTLAND, Ore. — Brittany Maynard, a young California woman who was suffering from terminal brain cancer and gained national attention for her plan to use Oregon’s assisted suicide law, ended her life Nov. 1. She was 29 years old. Continue reading