Home   »   News   »   News – World
Bright lights, cool air protect Sistine Chapel from visiting hordes

The Sistine Chapel is illuminated with new LED lighting at the Vatican Oct. 29. A new lighting system was donated by Osram, a German lighting company. A new air conditioning system also was donated and installed by the U.S.-based Carrier company. The chapel now is cooler and better lit with the new systems, which will help preserve Michelangelo Buonarroti's masterpiece. (CNS photo/Paul Haring)

By Cindy Wooden
Catholic News Service 

VATICAN CITY — The Vatican is not promising visitors to the Sistine Chapel more elbow room, but it is guaranteeing a cooler experience.

Marking the year of the 450th anniversary of Michelangelo Buonarroti’s death, the Vatican Museums hope the brand new air conditioning system and the 7,000 new LED lights will preserve the Renaissance artist’s masterpiece for generations to come. Continue reading

 
CRS manages ‘safe and dignified’ burials of Sierra Leone Ebola victims
A Kenyan Port Health Services worker wearing full personal protective equipment commands a small boy, who is among nine Kenyans who were stranded in the Ebola-hit country Liberia, to return to an observation room for Ebola screening, as they arrive at Jomo Kenyatta International Airport Oct. 28 in Nairobi, Kenya. During his weekly general audience Oct. 29, Pope Francis urged prayers and international action to fight the Ebola virus. (CNS photo/Daniel Irungu, EPA) See POPE-EBOLA Oct. 29, 2014.

A Kenyan Port Health Services worker wearing full personal protective equipment commands a small boy, who is among nine Kenyans who were stranded in the Ebola-hit country Liberia, to return to an observation room for Ebola screening, as they arrive at Jomo Kenyatta International Airport Oct. 28 in Nairobi, Kenya. (CNS photo/Daniel Irungu, EPA)

By Bronwen Dachs
Catholic News Service 

CAPE TOWN, South Africa — Burials that are dignified and safe are urgently needed for Ebola victims in West Africa, where corpses are frequently left unattended for days and then thrown into graves without ceremony, a U.S. church aid official said.

“So many people are dying that there has not been the capacity to respond” to burial needs in an appropriate way and “we are now making this a priority,” Michael Stulman, regional information officer for the U.S. bishops’ Catholic Relief Services, said in a telephone interview from Freetown, Sierra Leone. Continue reading

 
Pope Francis says Pope Benedict was a ‘great pope’

Pope Francis greets emeritus Pope Benedict XVI during an encounter for the elderly in St. Peter's Square at the Vatican Sept. 28. (CNS photo/Paul Haring)

By Cindy Wooden
Catholic News Service 

VATICAN CITY — Retired Pope Benedict XVI is a perfect example of how intellectual knowledge and scientific curiosity do not lead a person further from God, but can strengthen their love for God and for his human creatures, Pope Francis said.

“Benedict XVI was a great pope,” he said: “Great for the power and penetration of his intellect, great for his considerable contribution to theology, great for his love for the church and for human beings, great for his virtues and his religiosity.”

Pope Francis praised his predecessor Oct. 27 at a meeting of the Pontifical Academy of Sciences. The academicians invited Pope Francis to unveil a bronze bust of Pope Benedict at the academy’s headquarters in the Vatican Gardens.

The pope said he was pleased that the statue’s face and particularly its eyes captured the spirit, intelligence and love of Pope Benedict.

“This spirit, far from crumbling with the passing of time, will appear greater and more powerful from generation to generation,” the pope predicted.

With his intellectual curiosity and his love for science, Pope Benedict especially enjoyed conversing with scientists at the Pontifical Academy, Pope Francis said.

“No one could ever say of him that study and science made him and his love for God and his neighbor wither. On the contrary, knowledge, wisdom and prayer enlarged his heart and his spirit,” the pope said. “Let us thank God for the gift that he gave the church and the world with the existence and the pontificate of Pope Benedict.”

Posted Oct. 27, 2014

 
Pope Francis calls for abolishing death penalty and life imprisonment
The electric chair that executed 125 men between 1916 and 1960 in Tennessee is seen on display at the National Museum of Crime and Punishment in Washington March 5. (CNS photo/Jim Lo Scalzo, EPA) See POPE-PUNISHMENT Oct. 23, 2014.

The electric chair that executed 125 men between 1916 and 1960 in Tennessee is seen on display at the National Museum of Crime and Punishment in Washington March 5. (CNS photo/Jim Lo Scalzo, EPA)

By Francis X. Rocca
Catholic News Service 

VATICAN CITY — Pope Francis called for abolition of the death penalty as well as life imprisonment, and denounced what he called a “penal populism” that promises to solve society’s problems by punishing crime instead of pursuing social justice. Continue reading

 
Synod ends by affirming tradition, leaving controversial questions open
Pope Francis attends the morning session on the final day of the extraordinary Synod of Bishops on the family at the Vatican Oct. 18. At left is Cardinal Lorenzo Baldisseri, general secretary of the Synod of Bishops, and at right Cardinal Peter Erdo of Esztergom-Budapest, Hungary, relator for the synod. (CNS photo/Paul Haring) See SYNOD-MESSAGES and SYNOD-CONCLUSION Oct. 18, 2014.

Pope Francis attends the morning session on the final day of the extraordinary Synod of Bishops on the family at the Vatican Oct. 18. At left is Cardinal Lorenzo Baldisseri, general secretary of the Synod of Bishops, and at right Cardinal Peter Erdo of Esztergom-Budapest, Hungary, relator for the synod. (CNS photo/Paul Haring)

By Francis X. Rocca
Catholic News Service 

VATICAN CITY — After several days of animated debate over its official midterm report, the Synod of Bishops on the family agreed on a final document more clearly grounded in traditional Catholic teaching. Yet the assembly failed to reach consensus on especially controversial questions of Communion for the divorced and civilly remarried and the pastoral care of homosexuals. Continue reading

 
Pope beatifies Blessed Paul VI, the ‘great helmsman’ of Vatican II
A tapestry of Blessed Paul VI hangs from the facade of St. Peter's Basilica during his beatification Mass celebrated by Pope Francis in St. Peter's Square at the Vatican Oct. 19. The Mass also concluded the extraordinary Synod of Bishops on the family. Blessed Paul, who served as pope from 1963-1978, is most remembered for his 1968 encyclical, "Humanae Vitae," which affirmed the church's teaching against artificial contraception. (CNS photo/Paul Haring) See BEATIFICATION-MASS Oct. 19, 2014.

A tapestry of Blessed Paul VI hangs from the facade of St. Peter's Basilica during his beatification Mass celebrated by Pope Francis in St. Peter's Square at the Vatican Oct. 19. The Mass also concluded the extraordinary Synod of Bishops on the family. Blessed Paul, who served as pope from 1963-1978, is most remembered for his 1968 encyclical, "Humanae Vitae," which affirmed the church's teaching against artificial contraception. (CNS photo/Paul Haring

By Francis X. Rocca
Catholic News Service

VATICAN CITY —Beatifying Blessed Paul VI at the concluding Mass of the Synod of Bishops on the family, Pope Francis praised the late pope as the “great helmsman” of the Second Vatican Council and founder of the synod, as well as a “humble and prophetic witness of love for Christ and his church.”

The pope spoke during a homily in St. Peter’s Square at a Mass for more than 30,000 people, under a sunny sky on an unseasonably warm Oct. 19. Continue reading

 
Synod working groups emphasize beauty of marriage, church teaching

Cardinal Peter Erdo of Esztergom-Budapest, Hungary, relator for the extraordinary Synod of Bishops on the family, talks with Cardinal Angelo Sodano, retired Vatican secretary of state, as they arrive for the morning session of the extraordinary Synod of Bishops on the family at the Vatican Oct. 16. (CNS photo/Paul Haring)

By Carol Glatz
Catholic News Service 

VATICAN CITY — The extraordinary Synod of Bishops on the family must put greater focus on the beauty of the Christian vision of marriage and not let an approach of “welcoming” and mercy override the church’s duty to call people to turn away from sin, according to a number of reports from the synod’s small groups. Continue reading

 
African cardinal: Pressure groups behind push to change Church teaching

CNA Graphic

CNA/EWTN News

VATICAN — Innacurate media reports about Church teaching on homosexuality published after the synod’s midterm relatio are an attempt to pressure the Church to change its perennial teaching, a cardinal who is also a synod father has affirmed.

Cardinal Robert Sarah, president of the Pontifical Council Cor Unum, emphasized to CNA Oct. 16 that “what has been published by the media about homosexual unions is an attempt to push the Church (to change) her doctrine.” Continue reading

 
Anglican, Lutheran delegates say synod’s concerns are theirs, too

Cardinals Timothy M. Dolan of New York, Stanislaw Rylko, president of the Pontifical Council for the Laity, and Raymond L. Burke, prefect of the Supreme Court of the Apostolic Signature, arrive for the morning session of the extraordinary Synod of Bishops on the family at the Vatican Oct. 14. (CNS photo/Paul Haring)

By Cindy Wooden
Catholic News Service 

VATICAN CITY — Upholding the Christian ideal of marriage and family life while also reaching out to those whose lives do not reflect that ideal is a pastoral challenge faced by all Christian communities, said the Anglican representative to the Synod of Bishops.

Anglican Bishop Paul Butler of Durham, England, and “fraternal delegates” from seven other Christian communities addressed the synod Oct. 10. Continue reading

 
How an incorrect translation of the synod report created chaos

CNA Graphic

CNA/EWTN News

VATICAN CITY — An incorrect translation into English of the original midterm report of the Synod on the Family may have spurred controversial interpretations of the document itself.

The document’s original version was written in Italian, which Pope Francis directed to be used as the official language of the synod. In prior synods the official language had been Latin, esteemed for its precision and lack of ambiguity. Continue reading