Home»Local News»Meet Mark Machuga New Deacon Office director: Building Brotherhood

Meet Mark Machuga New Deacon Office director: Building Brotherhood

2
Shares
Pinterest Google+
Deacon Mark Machuga, Director of Diaconate Office. (Courtesy Photo)
Deacon Mark Machuga, Director of Diaconate Office. (Courtesy Photo)

Deacon Mark Machuga has only been a deacon for eight months, but the Youngstown native has been a devoted Catholic for a lifetime, and plans to use his corporate experience as a project manager and world experience as a husband and father (son, 30; daughter 28,) to carry the work of the diaconate forward.

Machuga had been involved in the Church since his days as an altar boy at St. Luke’s in Youngstown, and when he came to Cincinnati in 1983 for a job with DuBois Chemicals. But after losing a later job of 22 years in a 2010 downsizing at Convergys, Machuga felt he had reached a turning point. He found a job with Hewlett Packard but knew there was more to do in his life.

A computer technology expert and project manager by training (Youngstown State and George Wash-ington Universities), he turned to his faith.

He discussed becoming a deacon with his wife and then with his pastor, Father James Reutter at Our Lady of Victory in Delhi. Encouraged by both, he was accepted into the Lay Pastoral Ministry program at Mount St. Mary’s Seminary of the West in 2011. All deacon candidates must first complete that pro-gram.

Machuga graduated in 2013 and was ordained a deacon in 2016. When the Archdiocese’s previous Diaconate Director, Deacon David Profitt, left to become director of St. Anne Retreat Center in the Diocese of Covington, he decided to apply for the job.

“My wife, Julie, was very supportive,” he said. “She was convinced form the beginning that I would get this job.”

While confident he could handle the challenge, he said he prayed that the right person would get the job, regardless of who that might be. He began as Director of the Office of the Deaconate October 31st.
Machuga’s initial plan is to meet with the Archdiocese’s more than 200 deacons. Early in that process, for example, he learned that they want a revival of regional meetings and Deacon Advisory Board.

Machuga’s initial plan is to meet with the Archdiocese’s more than 200 deacons. Early in that process, for example, he learned that they want a revival of regional meetings and Deacon Advisory Board.

Machuga said he wants to build a brotherhood of deacons in the archdiocese, despite differences that include parish geography and age ranges. “We have married, widowed, and single men,” he said. “And we also have to ensure that their wives receive support because they are important to the deacons. The sacrifices that deacons’ wives make are significant and often go unnoticed.”

Machuga said he has plenty of ideas, but he wants to get input from the deacon community before setting goals. “I don’t want to presume I know what’s in the minds of the deacons of our archdicoese,” he said. “I’ll spend the first several months meeting and talking with the men, and we’ll develop our long-range plans together.”

Previous post

SEEK 2017 inspires college students to evangelize at home campuses

Next post

Auxiliary Bishop Oscar Solis of Los Angeles named bishop of Salt Lake City