Posts Tagged

Trosley Column

Watching my father care for his father proved a chore for a pre-teen boy with his head full of kid thoughts and body full of kid energy. They did not speak much on those days when we went to pick up laundry and tidy up grandpa’s tiny apartment over Frenchie’s

Danny Diego always wore a huge smile. A guy who had beat childhood polio, he was not a man terribly impressed with obstacles. But as circulation manager of the Inland Valley Daily Bulletin in Ontario, Calif., 20 years ago, the smile would become a near grimace every New Year’s Day

“How Catholic Are We?” asks the April 2016 edition of Cincinnati Magazine. Over the next 20 well-designed pages is a package of well-written and well-researched stories and factoids that quantify the changes in church attendance and population in the greater Cincinnati metropolitan area. The numbers and sidebar stories support the

It’s one of those infamous dinnertime phone calls. “Hello, Steffen, this is Travis at Marketing Research Associates. You’ve been identified as an opinion leader and we value your opinions. I would like to ask you a few questions.” If you’re a registered voter and have a landline listed in one

The outrage about the conduct clause in the Archdiocese of Cincinnati teachers’ contract leaves this management veteran confounded and confused. In the several decades of my career in newspaper management, I enforced company policies that supported corporate and professional identity that included things as simple as dress codes and as

Newspaper and media content in general is based a lot on milestones. In days past, everyone could count on the “free” publication of a birth announcement, engagement and wedding announcements and their obituary.Often, you could get certain life milestones such as anniversaries – 25th, 50th, etc. – published and celebrating

September 2013 When you’re introduced to someone new in your community, what’s the first thing you think of to ask? What brought you here? Where’s home? Have you found a nice place to live?

American journalists have long lobbied for what has become known as a shield law. A shield law would protect reporters and editors from having to reveal sources that have supplied information for stories anonymously, or as those in the business say, without attribution.

March and April used to bring a flood of phone calls to the office of an editor in the upper Midwest, where I spent much of my career. I used to call it the great battle of the bobbin’ robin. We would get literally scores of calls from people wanting