Posts Tagged

Dominick Albano

I never thought of my mom as a single mother but, objectively, she was. My parents divorced when I was nine. From then on, it was just my older sister, my younger brother and me living at home with Mom. Maybe it was because Dad was still around and we

“To die would be a great adventure.” – Peter Pan The 1991 film Hook, though met with little critical acclaim, remains a classic for many Millennials. Directed by the legendary Steven Spielberg and featuring music composed by the great John Williams, the film stars cinema giants Dustin Hoffman, Julia Roberts

My life’s greatest regret happened during a baseball game my nine-year-old son was playing in. It’s a day I hate to remember, and yet I can’t forget it. Bottom of the last inning, my son’s team was up by one run, with runners on second and third base and two

March 19 is the Feast of St. Joseph, sometimes referred to as St. Joseph’s Day. This Feast of St. Joseph is extra special because it is also the Year of St. Joseph. With all of this St. Joseph-ness going on, it’s a great time to take a look at how

Kurt Vonnegut’s 2005 New York Times bestselling book, A Man Without a Country, changed my life. Without this book, I don’t know that I would have published two books, recorded an album, painted original works (that only my mother could love), written poetry or even if I would be writing

So, Christmas is over. Now what? I mean it kind of feels like a letdown, right? You have all these great celebrations of the liturgical year in Advent and Christmas and Lent and Easter, and then it’s just plain old Ordinary Time.’ Blah. But wait a second. That’s not right.

What do you think Jesus’ laugh sounded like? Do you think he snorted or giggled? Was it a hearty guffaw or a milder chuckle? What would it be like to hear Jesus when he was only three- or four-years-old, laughing as St. Joseph played with him? These kinds of reflections

Johnny had always wanted to help when his Uncle Mike dressed up as Santa and delivered gifts to kids in need before Christmas. His family collected gift lists from a local hospital or homeless shelter, then they’d get their neighbors or school families to donate gifts. And then, Uncle Mike

When I was 19, I traveled to the poorest country on this side of the world. As a middle-class, Midwestern white-kid traveling to Haiti on a mission trip, I had strong faith and missionary zeal, but nothing could have prepared me for the kind of abject poverty I had only

The 1973 short story, The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas, tells of a utopia complete with green fields, blue skies, shimmering buildings and happy people. But the city is built on a dark truth. In the bowels of the city, in the basement of a building, there exists a