Posts Tagged

Katie Sciba

Happy Bicentennial! We’re right in the middle of an historical event, marking 200 years of life, work and prayer at home in the Archdiocese of Cincinnati. If we open our eyes to it, we can realize in a more concrete way that, as individual Catholics, we’re part of something and

“An infinite God can give all of Himself to each of His children. He does not distribute Himself that each may have a part, but to each one He gives all of Himself as fully as if there were no others.” – Aiden W. Tozer (The Christy Wright Show, ep.

by Katie Sciba Congratulations! You’re a brand new godparent to a brand-new Catholic! From here on out, you have a duty to nurture and cultivate the Catholic faith in the heart of your godchild. It’s a big undertaking and can be one of the most significant roles you’ll ever have!

I recently received real help in the thick of a personal difficulty. The support came from a dear friend, who happily gave of herself so I could experience restoration. This kind of help calls for self-sacrifice and encountering real pain, but ultimately yields a deeper love and understanding for the

I’m just a few days into a consecration to St. Joseph. In anticipation of handing my merits and shortcomings over to the adoptive father of Jesus, I’m gaining more hope in St. Joseph as a leader, provider and protector of my own heart and family. I feel a pull, an

When we moved across town last February, one of the first things I did was hang our wall decor to make our new home feel like it belonged to us. The first thing to adorn our new walls was a crucifix. Modest in size, our crucifix packs a punch when

I typically wake up on January 1 with a fresh zeal for life. The previous year is gone, leaving a blank canvas in its place. It’s delightful and thrilling to hope for transformation! I have to admit, though, that I’m not anticipating the same New Year’s Day thrill this year.

by Katie Sciba My favorite children’s book is You Are Special by Max Lucado. It’s the story of a creature whose life is defined by what others think of him, which only worsens his low self-esteem. The tragedy of the story lies not in the main character, who eventually learns

I went to church and grade school across the street from a third-trimester abortion center. Back then, the pro-life movement was more angry than merciful, and, as a small child, I saw protesters on the sidewalk holding up graphic posters of aborted babies. I heard them yelling horrible accusations at

My husband and I had a disagreement a few weeks ago. We were both tense, defensive and in utter disbelief that the other held an opposing perspective. Andrew and I typically see eye to eye, or at the very least we understand one another, so coming to a stalemate made