Posts Tagged

Sarah Ater

Early 20th Century America saw a modern, concerted effort to promote the Black community’s rights, needs and dignity. However, movements were difficult to sustain. In Cincinnati during the 1880-1890s, Daniel Rudd published the short- lived, groundbreaking newspaper American Catholic Tribune to evangelize the Black community, and founded the Black Catholic

With joyous note let earth resound, o’er hill and dale let it rebound; A new Crusade do we proclaim with rapturous hearts in this refrain. Our banner to the winds unfurl, our battle-cry to all we hurl; Like knights of old there’s no reprieve until all men this truth receive.

Pictures of ladies at church bazaars and Knights of Columbus marching in a parade are common images of Catholic life. Through the centuries, parishes and local communities have created groups to enliven the faith life of its members. With the influx of immigrants in the 19th Century, parishes grew quickly.

In the archdiocese, there are “mother churches,” the first Catholic churches, for each region. In the East, that parish is St. Martin Church in Brown County. Thirty miles northeast of Cincinnati, Catholics began to settle in that area as early as 1820, though it was 10 years before the parish

Dayton was surveyed and platted in 1796. Following the War of 1812 and the completion of the Miami and Erie Canals in 1829, Dayton began to thrive. Emmanuel Parish established the first Catholic Church in Dayton in 1837. As with many churches in “mission” territory, it served as a base

“Confident that great good may be done in this city by the establishment of a female orphan asylum under your zealous and charitable care, I have written to the Rev. Mr. L. Deluol of Baltimore, your Superior, to beg him 3 or 4 of your pious Sisters who are well

What is the secret which enables the Catholic Church to hold together such staunch Catholic men to the number of more than one and a half million in the Holy Name Society alone? They believe that Christ is divine, and that He is really and truly present in the Holy

by Sarah Ater “Since my arrival in this country, I wrote you, satisfied that every exertion would be made to establish a church in this part of the country, as it has been and is my greatest expectation in coming here…There are of our profession [of faith] in this place

by Sarah Ater Daniel Rudd can be counted as one of the most influential Catholics during his time in the Archdiocese of Cincinnati. Indeed, his influence reached throughout the U.S. A man of deep faith, zeal for justice and untiring activity, Rudd founded the American Catholic Tribune (ACT), the first

Curious about what was on the minds of Cincinnati Catholics June 8, 1831? You can read an ode to spring by Barry Cornwall. And if you are curious about what a man named O’Quinn was doing running for Mayor of Pau, France, in 1861, just turn to page 6 of