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Archbishop John B. Purcell

In 1833 the Diocese of Cincinnati encompassed the entire state of Ohio. Bishop Fenwick did what he could to minister to the French and Native American Catholics located 500 miles north of Cincinnati. But Catholics were scattered throughout the state and infrequently visited by a priest. Missionary efforts in the

During the 1849 cholera epidemic that killed thousands in Cincinnati alone, parishioners of what is now Nativity of the Blessed Virgin Mary in Cassella gathered in their log church and prayed to St. Sebastian for relief – and no one from the parish died. Maria-Kapelle (Maria Chapel) is the name

    “History” is not the accumulation of facts in the past, but rather what we say about, and the use we put to, those facts. This is not to say the facts are unimportant, nor should they be manipulated by the historian. A conscientious historian wants to be as

by Eileen Connelly, OSU For its 175-year history, the Cathedral of St. Peter in Chains in Downtown Cincinnati has stood as a testament to the faith of Catholics in the archdiocese. The impressive Greek Revival structure, located at the intersection of Eighth and Plum Streets, is dedicated to God in

by Gail Finke There is a piece of the True Cross at Holy Cross-Immaculata in Mt. Adams. It is available for veneration on a side altar in the main church on Good Friday – see it when you pray the steps! Is the relic of the True Cross real? While

Bishop Binzer and members of the Central Offices of the Archdiocese of Cincinnati ready for the 2019 Findlay Market Opening Day Parade. (CT Photo/Greg Hartman)
The Cincinnati Reds were the 1st Major League Baseball team in 1869. Celebrating 150 years, the Archdiocesan Central Offices, Mascots from our Catholic High Schools, and the Drum Line from Purcell Marian High School marched in the 100th Findlay Market Opening Day Parade. In 1869, Archbishop John Baptist Purcell led

The ongoing legal disputes between the federal government and Little Sisters of the Poor and other Catholic groups opposed to providing contraceptives as part of their health insurance plans isn’t unique in American, or even local history. According to the book Faith and Action: A History of the Archdiocese of Cincinnati,